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  • #31
    Hey BeeGee, wasnt that you a while ago talkin crap about producing converted milk milk trucks into mowing rigs? Hows that comin along? You get burned out on that to?
    SENIOR MODERATOR LSF COMMUNITY CONTROL CORDINATOR
    Have a Nice Day, from the Lawn Service Forum S.A.S.M
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    • #32
      The Business Failed, But Did You?
      by Tim Knox

      Small Business Q&A with Tim Knox

      Q: After years of dreaming about starting my own business, I
      finally took the plunge a little over a year ago. To say the
      least, my dream quickly became a nightmare. The business didn't
      do nearly as well as I had hoped. I ran out of money within six
      months and had to take out a second mortgage on my house just to
      keep things going. I have now closed the business and am left
      with a pile of bills that will probably put me in personal
      bankruptcy. I don't mean to take it out on you, but instead of
      telling people how great having your own business is all the
      time you should also warn them that starting a business is not
      easy and can be devastating when things go wrong.
      -- Gene K.

      A: Gene, I hope that I have never given anyone the impression
      that having your own business is a walk in the park. To the
      contrary, I'm like the proverbial Chicken Little when it comes
      to warning readers of the obstacles and pitfalls that await
      those considering the entrepreneurial plunge.

      To quote myself from a column I wrote earlier this year, "If it
      was easy, my friend, everybody would do it."

      Just to make sure we're in agreement, let me reiterate the
      standard warnings once again. Starting a business is incredibly
      hard work. It takes long hours and deep pockets. It demands
      unbridled passion and unquestioned commitment. It requires
      that you give of yourself until you often feel there is nothing
      left to give. And sometimes, even after you've done all that
      you can do and given all that you can give, the business fails.

      Period.

      Blood, sweat, and tears can only carry you so far in the business
      world. Good intentions and grand ideas won't pay the office
      rent. You can not make payroll with Monopoly money.

      I certainly don't mean to make light of your situation. In fact,
      I know exactly how you feel. I failed so miserably my first time
      in business that I swore I would never think about working for
      myself again. All I wanted to do was to find a nice, secure
      9-to-5 job that provided me with a nice steady paycheck. I
      yearned for the opportunity to grow fat and happy on someone
      else's payroll for a change.

      I never again wanted to have to think about customers or
      employees or withholding taxes or accounts receivable or
      anything else even remotely associated with being in business.

      I just wanted to crawl in a hole and die because my business had
      failed, and in my All-American, macho male, "you are what you
      do" brain that meant that I was a failure, too.

      Getting over the failure of a business can be extremely difficult,
      especially if you are one of those entrepreneurs (like I was) who
      wrongly relates the success or failure of a business to the
      success or failure of you as a person.

      The best way that I know of to get over the failure of a business
      (and the deep feelings of personal failure that go along with it)
      is to do an autopsy of the business to help find out exactly what
      went wrong. Only by discovering our weakness can we build on
      our strengths (Yogi Berra eat your heart out).

      It took a long time and an enormous amount of reflection to
      realize that the business had failed for many reasons, not simply
      because I was a miserable excuse for an entrepreneur. I wasn't
      looking to shuck the blame so much as simply trying to understand
      what really went wrong. A few years later when I mustered the
      courage to take the plunge again, I did so with the knowledge
      gained from my first failed business. I knew what I had done
      wrong and I knew what I'd done right. Lessons learned, put to
      good use. Knock wood, this time so far, so good.

      Performing an autopsy on a failed business is a simple process,
      but one that can reveal a wealth of information that you can use
      should you ever decide to step out onto the business high wire
      again.

      To do your business autopsy find a quiet place where you can sit
      and reflect on the life of your business. With pen and paper in
      hand (or laptop on lap) write down everything that you can think
      of that went right with the business and alternatively, everything
      that went wrong. Your goal is to create a "Success" versus
      "Failure" spreadsheet that will help you better understand
      exactly why the business went south.

      For the autopsy to be effective, it is imperative that you are
      completely honest with yourself. Shove your ego in a drawer
      and be completely realistic or the autopsy will just become
      an exercise in futility. You will end up looking for scapegoats
      instead of reasons.

      If your lack of experience was a contributing factor to the
      failure of the business, write it down. If your brilliant
      negotiating skills allowed you to close a big deal and beat
      out a competitor, write it down. If you were undercapitalized
      or incorrectly estimated your share of the market, write it down.
      If you had a partner who didn't pull his weight or a product
      that didn't sell as well as you thought it would or your building
      was flattened by an earthquake, write it down.
      Write it all down.

      Once you have all the facts in front of you, it's easy to see why
      the business really failed. You might be surprised to find out
      that the failure of the business wasn't completely your fault,
      after all.

      Then again, you might discover that the business failure was your
      fault. If that turns out to be the case, don't beat yourself
      up for long. Not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur and
      that's OK.

      The world would be a miserable place if everyone sat around
      whining about their lack of customers or complaining about
      their employees.

      Next time we'll take a look at the primary reasons businesses
      fail and discuss how you might avoid them.

      Here's to your success.

      Tim Knox
      SENIOR MODERATOR LSF COMMUNITY CONTROL CORDINATOR
      Have a Nice Day, from the Lawn Service Forum S.A.S.M
      www.lawnbook.com
      www.lawnservicing.com
      Click Here: For Lawn Care Business Kit
      Click Here: For FREE Marketing "Mini-Course"
      Please ask questions about the business here, I'm unable to answer them 1 on 1.
      Please Visit Our Sponsors, They Make this Forum Possible!
      NOW AVAILABLE FOR FREE LSF IN 5.0 !!! JUST PM GRASSMASTER TO GET YOURS TODAY!!

      ""POYMIT"

      ATTRITION

      Comment


      • #33
        When you hang tough no matter what, and succeed you'll have the battle scars to prove it. I guaran-damn - t -you... it's an unbelievable feeling when you kick down the walls or barriers of resistance.

        Success breeds success, it's important to not give up no matter what until you taste some success. After that look out you are unstopable!
        Sodbuster®
        Environmental Horticulturist
        CPA



        Nobody knows the ground rules of landscaping like Sodbuster®. I should. I wrote them.™

        Comment


        • #34
          You mean Union City Body Company wanting to build a green industry upfit?

          I talked with them a half dozen times, and sketched a few ideas I used on my aluminum step vans.

          I'm sure they'll be back in touch with me sooner or later, but at this time, I have no news. It isn't like I aim to make a case for royalties or anything......
          GEEVEE, Pat.Pend. TM, UL

          If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough

          Comment


          • #35
            This thread's got some great reading in it.

            I've considered changing my business around a little bit to make it a little more 'exciting'. Money wise, everything is fine. Besides the shop and home, I will be debt free in about a year. And I hope to stay that way and purchase trucks with cash to do so. Equipment is always paid in cash anyway.

            Most of us in this thread have just about mastered this business I think. At least on the level we are all at. So, I'm wondering about that next step, and what step it will be. I've considered letting my longest term foreman literally take over 'everything' here while I start up something new. Completely new? I don't know. Same industry, but different location? I don't know.

            I got into this business pretty young, and it's all I've really done. Granted, I LOVE what I do, I really do. I like going to work each and every day. But I have other things I'm also good at that I want to try out. I have so many ideas that I want to give a shot at. No one ever said you can't have a green industry biz you enjoy and then something else.




            P.S.-- I assume you guys are just poking fun at one another in this thread? Because you 3 guys each know your stuff quite well, and from what I know, you're all good guys that get shiit done.
            a.k.a.---> Erich

            www.avalawnlandscaping.com


            Build a man a fire, he'll be warm for a day.
            Set a man on fire, he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Scaper-S2k
              P.S.-- I assume you guys are just poking fun at one another in this thread? .
              I hereby challenge Mr. Ric to a 3 round caged match at the OSU horse shoe.
              I will tie 1 arm behind my back and 1 leg to a corner post. No gloves and no Zinc enhancing chemicals of any kind . Winner of the bout receives 1 week free of slamming?
              SENIOR MODERATOR LSF COMMUNITY CONTROL CORDINATOR
              Have a Nice Day, from the Lawn Service Forum S.A.S.M
              www.lawnbook.com
              www.lawnservicing.com
              Click Here: For Lawn Care Business Kit
              Click Here: For FREE Marketing "Mini-Course"
              Please ask questions about the business here, I'm unable to answer them 1 on 1.
              Please Visit Our Sponsors, They Make this Forum Possible!
              NOW AVAILABLE FOR FREE LSF IN 5.0 !!! JUST PM GRASSMASTER TO GET YOURS TODAY!!

              ""POYMIT"

              ATTRITION

              Comment


              • #37
                P.S.-- I assume you guys are just poking fun at one another in this thread? Because you 3 guys each know your stuff quite well, and from what I know, you're all good guys that get shiit done.
                __________________
                a.k.a.---> Erich
                -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                I know I'm one, -who're the other two?

                TFF
                GEEVEE, Pat.Pend. TM, UL

                If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by GeeVee
                  P.S.-- I assume you guys are just poking fun at one another in this thread? Because you 3 guys each know your stuff quite well, and from what I know, you're all good guys that get shiit done.
                  __________________
                  a.k.a.---> Erich
                  -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  I know I'm one, -who're the other two?

                  TFF
                  SodBuster and GrassMaster

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by GeeVee
                    P.S.-- I assume you guys are just poking fun at one another in this thread? Because you 3 guys each know your stuff quite well, and from what I know, you're all good guys that get shiit done.
                    __________________
                    a.k.a.---> Erich
                    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    I know I'm one, -who're the other two?

                    TFF

                    I was referring to the 3 of you that were poking fun at each other. Well, I was hoping you guys were just poking fun. Those 3 were GeeVee, Ric, and Seascape.


                    Unless I missed a couple other people in this thread that were jabbing back and forth.
                    a.k.a.---> Erich

                    www.avalawnlandscaping.com


                    Build a man a fire, he'll be warm for a day.
                    Set a man on fire, he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Cant open air breather

                      Originally posted by Scaper-S2k View Post
                      This thread's got some great reading in it.

                      I've considered changing my business around a little bit to make it a little more 'exciting'. Money wise, everything is fine. Besides the shop and home, I will be debt free in about a year. And I hope to stay that way and purchase trucks with cash to do so. Equipment is always paid in cash anyway.

                      Most of us in this thread have just about mastered this business I think. At least on the level we are all at. So, I'm wondering about that next step, and what step it will be. I've considered letting my longest term foreman literally take over 'everything' here while I start up something new. Completely new? I don't know. Same industry, but different location? I don't know.

                      I got into this business pretty young, and it's all I've really done. Granted, I LOVE what I do, I really do. I like going to work each and every day. But I have other things I'm also good at that I want to try out. I have so many ideas that I want to give a shot at. No one ever said you can't have a green industry biz you enjoy and then something else.




                      P.S.-- I assume you guys are just poking fun at one another in this thread? Because you 3 guys each know your stuff quite well, and from what I know, you're all good guys that get shiit done.


                      This is very well said and sounds like a good plan too regarding building up a new business. It just shows that when you really love what you do, that's where success comes in. This is a very good thread and very informative. Thanks guys!

                      Jeff Farmer
                      Towing Arlington VA

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