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Trimming? pruning? what's the difference?

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  • Trimming? pruning? what's the difference?

    Can anybody please clear up the difference between pruning and trimming of trees or shrubs? How would this be charged?
    ROB-KEEPING NEAT AND GREEN IN SAN ANTONIO

  • #2
    reply

    Hi Lawn Star,
    I am fairly new to this, though these are my thoughts on the two. Pruning means pruning of roses, flowers, etc. In other words to prune selectively, if you prune a tree you are pruning selective branches (possible to let more light in the center for better growth). Trimming means to trim the edge of something. When trimming trees, shrubs, etc... You are trimming all of the tree or shrub non-selectively. Hope this makes sense. This is my take on the two at least.
    As for charging, I believe you would typically only charge for trimming of trees or large shrubs. The way I charge for the two, is I estimate how many hours it would take to do it for two guys, then add on your profit to that.

    Pruning of Large tree
    Total hours: 3
    Total men: 2
    Rate per man hour: $30
    Total $180.00

    If I am only paying my guys $10.00 per hr., then that is a profit of $120.00 more or less.

    Though as I mentioned, I am fairly new to running my own operation here, but this is how I have been doing it so far.

    Hope this helps


    Regards,
    dschoefer
    Schoefer Landscaping and Lawn Care
    sunflowergarden.com

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    • #3
      reply

      The definition that dshoefer gives for Trimming is actually the definition of Shearing. Trim & prune are interchangeable basically. The definition of Pruning is the intentional removal of any plant part with the exception of harvesting cut flowers, fruits or vegetables. So you will often see the word Trim used for the word Prune. To charge for these services you determine how long it will take and how much debris will need to be taken away & what it costs to dispose of that debris. There are many good books out there that describe well how to CORRECTLY prune many of the ornamentals that we run into, as opposed to shearing everything incorrectly, which is what I see a lot of. I'm guilty of it too LOL. I have a neighbor who insists that I shear her forsythia into an ugly ball every year, ugly & unhealthy for the plant!
      BRL

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      • #4
        reply

        Sorry about that, I stand corrected. Learn something new every day.
        Regards,
        dschoefer
        Schoefer Landscaping and Lawn Care
        sunflowergarden.com

        Comment


        • #5
          reply

          Without resorting to my Webster, I have always know pruning to be selective and trimming to be non-selective(shaping). Pruning will no doubt take longer and require more experience to be done correctly thus you must charge more. Trimming, on the other hand, can be accomplished with less experience and knowledge of plant structure.

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          • #6
            reply

            The definitions I gave came from a Taylor's Master Guide to Gardening Book. I also saw those definitions in another pruning book I have.
            My Webster's says Prune: to trim dead or living parts from a plant Trim: (the part that applies here)2. to clip, cut, lop, etc.

            On the subject of pruning, I forgot to post some sites I had in my Bookmarks that may be helpful to some.
            http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/hort/g06870.htm
            http://www.ces.uga.edu/pubcd/b949-w.html
            http://gardening.about.com/library/weekly/aa041399.htm

            BRL

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            • #7
              reply

              I once had a girlfriend who was a prune....or was that a prude?



              Ken
              GreenPro
              Ken
              GreenPro

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              • #8
                reply

                The University of Georgia College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences has a great publication on pruning. The publication covers the three T's for successful pruning: tools, technique, and timing.
                The website is:
                http://www.ces.uga.edu/pubcd/B961-W.HTML
                the article is 14 pages, and as it says anyone can prune, but not everyone prunes properly.

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                • #9
                  reply

                  well really now does your customer really know the difference if they are getting the service they wanted
                  BIG LOU

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                  • #10
                    Re: Trimming? pruning? what's the difference?

                    From my point of view to trim a tree is to remove extra large branches so that enough sunlight reaches the whole tree and it should grow properly and to prune is to remove the dead and dying branches so that the tree flourish properly.
                    sebastopol stump grinding

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