Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

"Organic pesticides don't harm the environment."

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "Organic pesticides don't harm the environment."

    We're talking pesticides, and on the organic side of the equation, this means things like insecticidal soaps, Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis), pyrethrum (from African mums), and rotenone (pea family). You'll see these listed as the active ingredients in all sorts of organic pesticides.

    What is important to remember is that a pesticide contains a chemical that is a poison, whether the chemical is organic or synthetic. "Organic" means the chemical is derived from the earth, its deposits, or its plants. "Synthetic" means the chemical is made by evil Republicans in lab coats. Either way, the chemical kills bugs.

    All chemicals used in pesticides are rated on a scale called EIQ, or Environmental Impact Quotient. The chemicals are tested for range of toxicity, or what it is they will harm or kill. Let's say the chemical doesn't harm people in anything short of beer-chugging amounts; that might merit a 2. But an ounce of the stuff in a stretch of stream kills all the fish; give it a 10. The chemicals are tested for how long they stay in the soil, in plants, if they kill bees, if they kill worms, etc.

    Here are some interesting EIQs:

    Bt (organic) 13.5
    Acephate (synthetic) 17.9
    Soap (organic) 19.5
    Carbaryl (synthetic) 22.6
    Malathion (synthetic) 23.2
    Rotenone (organic) 33.0
    Sabadilla (organic) 35.6

    You can see that some organic chemicals-and all of these are in use-have a higher Environmental Impact Quotient than some synthetics, notably the synthetic Carbaryl (which is Sevin), one of the most commonly used synthetic pesticides in the world.

    But organic pesticides have very real drawbacks. Most of them have broad spectrums, meaning they kill beneficial insects (just like those dangerous synthetic chemicals). They are not as thoroughly tested as synthetics. Batch strength can vary. And, perhaps most dangerous of all, they are perceived by the gardening public as safe. Nothing could be farther from the truth.

    Pyrethrum is a widely used organic chemical, used by organic vegetable growers, and used by commercial industries as the toxin in sprays designed to kill everything from wasps to asparagus beetles. It's also a nerve toxin, and extremely dangerous to infants. Never use wasp spray around an infant, or you will learn just how dangerous some of Mother Earth's little secrets can be.

    From http://www.renegadegardener.com/


    Quality Is Good

  • #2
    Good useful post!

    Comment


    • #3
      So what is the EIQ of pyrethrum? I didn't see it listed.

      Even when something is natural like BT, it's interesting how many people still show their ignorance and give into the hysteria of anti-everything. For example, a couple of years ago there was an outbreak of Gypsy Moth in the urban forests of greater Seattle. The WA Dept of Ag contracted to have helicopter spray work done with BT and spent a small fortune on PR work only to have "environmentalists" protest. These ignorant people were willing to let the urban forest get infected rather than deal with the problem. They had zero understanding that doing nothing put all of the "evergreen State" at risk. The spray work was done, but you would have thought the world was coming to an end.

      So what is the EIQ of nicotene?

      Comment


      • #4
        Let's think for a second.......what is worse for a person.......using hairspray in an enclosed area (such as a bathroom) OR using a product to controll a pest CORRECTLY.

        How about using LD50?

        Ron Howard: Is that... vodka... and wheat grass?
        Homer: It's called a "lawnmower". I invented it. Want one?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 1Chavez View Post
          Let's think for a second.......what is worse for a person.......using hairspray in an enclosed area (such as a bathroom) OR using a product to controll a pest CORRECTLY.

          How about using LD50?
          Has anyone done a comparsion between "organic" and synthetic pesticides using the LD50 as testing criteria?
          Noli nothis permittere te terere

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow thanks for accepting me here in this forum. It's my pleasure to meet chatters here, any way as a newbie I would like to have a favor that someone who can read my question and have an idea about it please give me an info regarding on this matter. This is my question what can you say about pest control Burbank?

            Comment


            • #7
              Pest Control Burbank??????

              Originally posted by godfer View Post
              Wow thanks for accepting me here in this forum. It's my pleasure to meet chatters here, any way as a newbie I would like to have a favor that someone who can read my question and have an idea about it please give me an info regarding on this matter. This is my question what can you say about pest control Burbank?
              i'm thinking this ole boy ain't clicking on it.............DANGER WILL ROBERTSON..................

              steve-o
              "THE BADDEST LAWN APE ON THE PLANET"

              Comment


              • #8
                I recommend Oregon Tilth if you or your customers are interested in Organic Certification or organic practices.
                My orchard and farm have been certified by Oregon Tilth-by far the most stringent in the country and probably the world-since 1989. We file enough paperwork to start a business every year with State, Fed, and OTC.
                Finally at least the Feds are giving smaller farmers a tax rebate up to 75%.
                I am also 'Salmon Safe'.
                My business sells 90% to very high end restaurants and last year we were at capacity!
                When we started in 1989 I think I could safely say 30-50% of the members were just plain nuts. They believed in "Moon dust from Jupiter" , and I am not kidding!
                In 2013 organic practices have become much more standardized and scientific. If you have used an IUPAC chemical in your soil-they will audit your soil and thru mass Spec analysis they will tell you when, where, and what concentration. In short, the certification process has gained respectability.
                It is very expensive to be certified organic. There are no trade offs when it comes to the soil. Non organic farms use chemicals. My organic certified business has invested heavily in Kubota, Stihl, and a bunch of very hard working Mexicans!

                Rock on!
                Incitatus for the US Senate !

                Comment


                • #9
                  I hope that these Organic pesticides don't harm the environment, I am shifting to organic food and lifestyle. Now i eat only organic food the food nom shares so many health related updates so i usually get to know more about health and food from there. Using organic products should be our number one priority.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X